Holiday Entitlement | What You Should Know


According to government sources, if you work a five day week you are entitled to 5.6 weeks’ paid holiday a year. This is known as our statutory or annual leave entitlement.

At first sight, 5.6 weeks looks to be an odd number of days, but it refers to a normal working week of five days. Accordingly, the 5.6 weeks translates to 28 working days.

Interestingly, an employer can include bank holidays as part of your annual leave entitlement.

Employee-Holiday-Entitlement

What About Part-Timers?

Part-time workers are still entitled to 5.6 weeks, but this will be reduced to reflect the number of days a week that they work. For example, if you work a three day week you would be entitled to at least 16.8 days leave in a year (3 x 5.6).

What If I Work Six Days A Week?

The goal posts to not shift if you work more than 5 days a week. The statutory limit of 28 days still applies.

These paid leave entitlements apply to “workers”. A person is defined as a worker if:

  • they have a contractor other arrangement to do work or services personally for a reward (your contract doesn’t have to be written),
  • their reward is for money or a benefit in kind, for example the promise of a contract or future work,
  • they only have a limited right to send someone else to do the work (subcontract),
  • they have to turn up for work even if they don’t want to,
  • their employer has to have work for them to do as long as the contract or arrangement lasts,
  • they aren’t doing the work as part of their own limited company in an arrangement where the ‘employer’ is actually a customer or client.

A Final Definition

An employee is a worker with an employment contract. This contract may define other benefits that are not available to a worker with no employment contract.

At Bracey’s, we offer bookkeeping and payroll services that ensure all employees holiday allowances are covered. Speak to our team today to find out more. 


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